Woodland and Water – a success story in Kent

 As the Woodland Trust launches its new report ‘Stemming the flow’ here is a timely guest blog from one of our Councillor Tree Champions, Cllr Tony Harwood.tony harwood

“Almost 1000 properties were affected by flooding from rivers across Kent earlier this year.

 However, against this backdrop there were small glimmers of hope. A local success story involves the River Len, a small and heavily urbanised tributary of the River Medway in Maidstone. In autumn 2000, under similar rainfall conditions, the Len had flooded commercial and residential property in Maidstone town centre.

 In 2002 the acquisition of 2.5 hectares of the River Len corridor was negotiated by Maidstone Council as environmental mitigation for a new supermarket and business park extension. Much of this land was then shrouded in concrete and littered with hundreds of used tyres and other fly-tipping. Indeed, in autumn 2000 floodwater had scudded-off the impermeable hard-standing, bringing with it tonnes of man-made debris which had blocked weirs and culverts intensifying downstream flooding.

The River Len land acquisition didn’t include funding for maintenance, so since 2002 local councillors have worked with residents, ably supported by the Council’s street cleansing service, to remove tonnes of hard-standing and fly-tipping from the site. They have also introduced management designed to benefit landscape, wildlife and local people. Relict patches of alder, crack willow and sallow carr were expanded (mainly through natural regeneration), reed and sedge beds restored, pools and marshy areas re-created and sunlit rides opened-up and maintained. In 2014 the site was officially designated as a Local Nature Reserve.

Copyright Tony HarwoodOngoing recording of flora and fauna by local people  has shown a sharp increase in both biodiversity and biomass, with uncommon native species including water vole, Desmoulins’s Whorl Snail, White-legged Damselfly and Grass Snake all flourishing in their urban environment. 

The benefits from these changes were realised just before Christmas 2013, when Kent was hit by rainfall even more severe than that of autumn 2000. This time the re-naturalised banks of the River Len behaved very differently and instead of flood water (and debris) sheeting-off of acres of hard standing, the River Len corridor, and its damp woodland and reed beds, dramatically slowed flows and held-back huge volumes of flood water and debris.

Remarkably, no properties were directly flooded in Maidstone town centre as a result of inundation by the River Len. Indeed, storm water was even pumped from the nearby, at risk, Loose Stream catchment into the River Len – and still no serious property flooding resulted.

Just imagine the damage and misery that could be averted were more of the UK’s riverside ‘flood-woodlands’ restored along our watercourses using trees and other natural features.”

View the new report: Stemming the flow.

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7 Responses to Woodland and Water – a success story in Kent

  1. Ash says:

    This is all so positive. These examples should be broadcast throughout these islands

  2. sue thorne says:

    At last an enlighten town council/councillor. This is the sort of thing that should be happening everywhere. This should be national news in the media and certainly part of any local council CPD training. I it just shows what can be achieved with local help and co operation. A timely lesson for those of us who live on or near the levels in Somerset

    • Hi Sue. Thanks for your comments. Tony is one of about 15 Councillor Tree Champions across England. We are piloting the idea and hope that it will encourage more sharing of ideas around trees and woodland.

  3. daphnepleace says:

    Reblogged this on daphnegonewild and commented:
    I love this story. It shows how in just a short time, with the right sort of input, an important change for the better can be made. I think this story is important in itself, for that small area of our country, and even more so for illustrating so well what a few concerned individuals can do. Tyre dump to Local Nature Reserve in a few short years.

  4. daphnepleace says:

    I love this story. It shows how in just a short time, with the right sort of input, an important change for the better can be made. I think this story is important in itself, for that small area of our country, and even more so for illustrating so well what a few concerned individuals can do. Tyre dump to Local Nature Reserve in a few short years.

  5. There is also a new video on the subject: http://youtu.be/nSgtZf9S3qg

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